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Do I need to submit a Building Control Application?

Please find below a list of popular projects. If your project isn't listed or if you require further advice or assistance, please contact the Building Control Support Team on 01623 457389 or 01623 457245.

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Yes, you do require permission if you intend to underpin your property. Usually these works are undertaken on properties which have suffered from subsidence or other similar structural movement. An engineer is usually involved and a specific schedule of works is prepared to ensure the structural stability of yours and where applicable any neighbouring property is not adversely affected.

Yes, you do need permission if you are removing part of a chimney breast and providing structural support for the remaining sections of the chimney. You will usually need to submit structural calculations as part of your building regulation application. If you are removing the whole chimney stack from ground floor, you do not usually require building regulation permission, however if the chimney is providing lateral support to any wall an application will be needed. If you are in any doubt, you are advised to seek the advice of a structural engineer. Care should be taken when making good any floor or roof structures. If the chimney stack is part of a shared stack (on the separating wall between properties), building regulation will be required, since any alteration to part of the stack could cause structural issues or problems with discharging the products of combustion.

If the wall you intend to remove provides support for elements of structure (walls, floors, ceilings, roof) you do require building regulation consent. It should be noted that the wall to be removed may be providing lateral support to another wall and in such cases the removal of the wall will be considered a structural alteration for which building regulation consent is required. You will usually need to submit structural calculations as part of your building regulation application. Even if the wall you wish to remove is non-loadbearing, you may still require building regulation consent since it might adversely affect means of escape. Some timber walls are designed to support loads and so don’t assume that a stud wall is non-loadbearing, this is not always the case.

Yes, Building Regulation consent is required for the insertion of insulation into a cavity wall and consent is also required for the provision of external wall insulation. In most cases, the company undertaking these works will be registered with a competent scheme, such as CERTASS, CIGA, Blueflame Certification, NAPIT, Certsure or Stroma. If this is the case, the installer will register the works with their scheme provider and the local authority will receive notification that these works have been undertaken. You are advised to check that the installer is registered and can self-certify under the provisions of the building regulations, since if these works are undertaken without suitable certification, the works would be considered unauthorised.

Yes, Building Regulation consent is required if you intend to fix insulation to the external walls or your property. Unless the area of external walling to be renovated is less than 50% of the buildings overall wall surface area or less than 25% of the buildings overall envelope. Careful consideration must be given to existing structure and the impact installing external wall insulation could have on the building fabric. We will usually require a condensation risk report as part of the application. In most cases, the company undertaking these works will be registered with a competent scheme, such as BBA, CERTASS, Blueflame Certification, NAPIT, Certsure or Stroma. If this is the case, the installer will register the works with their scheme provider and the local authority will receive notification that these works have been undertaken. You are advised to check that the installer is registered and can self-certify the works under the provisions of the building regulations, since if these works are undertaken without suitable certification, the works would be considered unauthorised.

Yes, Building Regulation consent is required for the installation of internal wall insulation. Unless the area of internal walling to be renovated is less than 50% of the buildings overall wall surface area or less than 25% of the buildings overall envelope. If the works involve the provision of insulation to more than 25% of the overall wall area, building regulation consent is required. We will usually require a condensation risk report as part of the application. In most cases, the company undertaking these works will be registered with a competent scheme, such as BBA, CERTASS, Blueflame Certification, NAPIT, Certsure or Stroma. If this is the case, the installer will register the works with their scheme provider and the local authority will receive notification that these works have been undertaken. You are advised to check that the installer is registered and can self-certify the works under the provisions of the building regulations, since if these works are undertaken without suitable certification, the works would be considered unauthorised.

Yes, Building Regulation consent is required if you are replacing water-proof membrane on an existing flat roof. Unless the area of flat roof to be renovated is less than 50% of the buildings overall flat roof surface area or less than 25% of the buildings overall envelope.  

Yes, building regulation consent is required for the conversion of a loft space into a room. It doesn’t matter if the room is used as a bedroom, hobby room or any other similar use, consent will always be required. If you intend to board an area of your loft out for storage purposes, building regulation consent is not required, however care should be taken since the existing structure is likely to have been designed for limited loading. Access into a loft space for storage should only be via a retractable ladder, if a fixed ladder or staircase is installed, the room would be considered habitable and building regulation consent would be required. The conversion of an existing loft can provide additional living space, however, careful consideration must be given to various issues, such as means of escape, structural adequacy, insulation, etc. The application should be accompanied by a structural report of the adequacy of existing members and any strengthening requirements that are proposed.

Yes, building regulation consent is required if you intend to install a new bathroom, WC or shower room in a room which was not previously used for that purpose. Consideration will need to be given to the various issues including whether the existing structure is adequate if a bath is being installed and ensuring suitable extract ventilation is provided, etc. In some cases, the company undertaking these works may be registered with a competent scheme, such as APHC, Benchmark, BESCA, Certsure, HETAS, NAPIT or Stroma. If this is the case, the installer will register the works with their scheme provider and the local authority will receive notification that these works have been undertaken. You are advised to check that the installer is registered and can self-certify the works under the provisions of the building regulations, since if these works are undertaken without suitable certification, the works would be considered unauthorised. If you intend to replace existing fittings within an existing bathroom, building regulation consent is not required.

The following buildings would be considered exempt under the provisions of the building regulations: Any detached building less than 15m2 internal floor area, providing it: a) Is single-storey; and b) Contains no sleeping accommodation Any detached building less than 30m2 internal floor area, providing it: a) Is single-storey; and b) Contains no sleeping accommodation; and c) Is at least one metre from the boundary of the property Please note, the building can be positioned closer to the boundary if it is constructed of substantially non-combustible materials, for example brick/block walls with a timber/tiled or timber/felted roof.

You do not require building regulation consent to construct a conservatory, providing: a) It is single-storey (ground level); and b) It is less than 30m2 internal floor; and c) At least 50% of the wall area and 75% of the roof area is glazed/translucent; and d) Safety glass is provided in doors and adjacent windows within 300mm up to 1.5m from floor level and windows below 800mm from floor level); and e) Any external windows and doors covered by the conservatory are maintained*; and f) Any installed heating has independent controls * Please note – if you wish to replace any existing windows/doors as part of these works, building regulation consent is required unless the company undertaking these works is registered with a suitable competent persons scheme, for example, BM Trada, Blue Flame Certification, CERTASS, Certsure, Fensa, NAPIT, ASSURE or Stroma. If this is the case, the installer will register the works with their scheme provider and the local authority will receive notification that these works have been undertaken. You are advised to check that the installer is registered and can self-certify the works under the provisions of the building regulations, since if these works are undertaken without suitable certification, the works would be considered unauthorised. If you intend to alter an existing window opening to form a door (e.g. to install french doors), building regulation consent will be required for these works.

You do not require building regulation consent to construct a car port, providing: a) It is single-storey (ground level); and b) It is less than 30m2 internal floor area; and c) Is open on at least two sides

You do not require building regulation consent to construct a porch, providing: a) It is single-storey (ground level); and b) It is less than 30m2 internal floor area; and c) Safety glass is provided in doors and adjacent windows within 300mm up to 1.5m from floor level and windows below 800mm from floor level); and d) Any existing external windows and doors covered by the porch are maintained*; and e) Any installed heating has independent controls * Please note that if you wish to replace any existing windows/doors as part of these works, building regulation consent is required unless the company undertaking these works is registered with a suitable competent persons scheme, for example, BM Trada, Blue Flame Certification, CERTASS, Certsure, Fensa, NAPIT, ASSURE or Stroma. If this is the case, the installer will register the works with their scheme provider and the local authority will receive notification that these works have been undertaken. You are advised to check that the installer is registered and can self-certify the works under the provisions of the building regulations, since if these works are undertaken without suitable certification, the works would be considered unauthorised. If you intend to alter an existing window opening to form a door (e.g. to install french doors), building regulation consent will be required for these works.

Yes, you do require Building Regulation consent if you intend to replace windows in your property. You also require consent if you intend to replace any external door if it contains more than 50% glazing. In most cases the company undertaking these works will be registered with a suitable competent persons scheme, for example BM Trada, Blue Flame Certification, CERTASS, Certsure, Fensa, NAPIT, ASSURE or Stroma. If this is the case, the installer will register the works with their scheme provider and the local authority will receive notification that these works have been undertaken. You are advised to check that the installer is registered and can self-certify the works under the provisions of the building regulations, since if these works are undertaken without suitable certification, the works would be considered unauthorised.

You will require Building Regulation consent if you intend to replace any external door if it contains more than 50% glazing. In most cases the company undertaking these works will be registered with a suitable competent persons scheme, for example BM Trada, Blue Flame Certification, CERTASS, Certsure, Fensa, NAPIT, ASSURE or Stroma. If this is the case, the installer wil register the works with their scheme provider and the local authority will receive notification that these works have been undertaken. You are advised to check that the installer is registered and can self-certifiy the works under the provisions of the building regulations, since if these works are undertaken without suitable certification, the works would be considered unauthorised.

It depends, If you are replacing your roof covering like-for-like, for example replacing an old slate roof with new slates, the weight difference is no more or less than 15% and the roof is insulated with at least 100mm of fibre glass insulation, then building regulation consent is not required. If you are replacing your roof with a material that is 15% lighter or heavier, for example replacing an existing slate roof with concrete interlocking tiles, then building regulation consent is required. A check will need to be made on the existing roof timbers to make sure they are adequate for the additional loadings. It is often neessary to strengthen existing timbers as part of a re-roofing project.

 

Note: Click on the linked heading text to expand or collapse panels.